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Jean-Paul Addie

Assistant Professor    
Biography

Jean-Paul Addie is a critical urban geographer principally concerned with understanding the production, governance, and experience of regional urbanization. Drawing on a dialectical approach to the urban process under capitalism, his research focuses on the politics of urban infrastructure – the material elements and social relations that facilitate urbanization and foster distinct modes of urbanism – to address questions of access, mobility, and social justice. Jean-Paul has conducted qualitative comparative analysis on a range of interdisciplinary topics including university urbanism, transportation governance, suburbanization, city-regionalism, neoliberal urban policy, local democracy, and socio-spatial theory. His research has received funding from the European Commission, the British Council, and the Ontario Ministry of Training, College, and Universities and has been published in international journals including IJURR, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, Environment and Planning A, Regional Studies, and CITY.

Jean-Paul’s current research focuses on rethinking the urban university in the context of global urbanization. The project Situating the New Urban University examines how universities are adapting their institutional structures, pedagogies, and spatial strategies in response to the changing dynamics of contemporary urban society.

Prior to joining the Urban Studies Institute, Jean-Paul was a Marie Curie Fellow in the Department of Geography at University College London, and Provost Fellow and Lecturer in UCL’s Department of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Public Policy. He is a Visiting Fellow at the UCL City Leadership Lab and holds degrees in geography from York University, Miami University, and the University of Dundee.

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Publications
  1. Addie, J.-P. D., 2017, “Claiming the University for Critical Urbanism”, City: Analysis of Urban Trends, Culture, Theory, Policy, Action, 21(1), 65-80
  2. Addie, J.-P. D., 2017, “From the Urban University to Universities in Urban Society”, Regional Studies, 51(7), 1089-1099
  3. Keil, R. and Addie, J.-P. D., 2017, “Internalized Globalization and Regional Governance in the Toronto Region”, in Boudreau, J.-A., Hamel, P., Keil, R., and Kipfer, S. (eds.) Governing Cities through Regions: Canadian and European Perspectives (Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier Press) pp. 101-120
  4. Addie, J.-P. D., 2017, “Governing the Networked Metropolis: The Regionalization of Transportation in Southern Ontario”, in Boudreau, J.-A., Hamel, P., Keil, R., and Kipfer, S. (eds.) Governing Cities through Regions: Canadian and European Perspectives (Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier Press) pp.121-142
  5. Addie, J.-P. D., 2016, “Theorizing Suburban Infrastructure: A Framework for Critical and Comparative Analysis”, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 41(3), 273-285
  6. Addie, J.-P. D., 2016, “On the Road to the In-Between City: Excavating Peripheral Urbanization in Chicago’s ‘Crosstown Corridor’”, Environment and Planning A, 48(5), 825-843
  7. Keil, R., and Addie, J.-P. D., 2016, ‘It’s not going to be suburban, it’s going to be all urban’: Assembling Post-Suburbia in the Toronto and Chicago Regions, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 39(5), 892-911
  8. Addie, J.-P. D., and Paskins, J. 2016, “University College London: Leveraging the Civic Capacity of ‘London’s Global University’”, in Goddard, J., Hazelkorn, E., Kempton, L., and Vallance, P. (eds.) The Civic University: The Policy and Leadership Challenges (Cheltenham: Edward Elgar) pp. 257-277
  9. Addie, J.-P. D., 2016, “Engaging Universities as Partners and Proponents of the New Urban Agenda: Coordination, Spatial Strategies, Access” (London: UN-Habitat UNI and UCL City Leadership Lab)
  10. Addie, J.-P. D. and Keil, R., 2015, “Real Existing Regionalism: The Region between Talk, Territory and Technology”, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 39(2), 407-417
  11. Addie, J.-P. D., Keil, R. and Olds, K., 2015, “Beyond Town and Gown: Universities, Territoriality and the Mobilization of New Urban Structures in Canada”, Territory, Politics, Governance, 3(1), 27-50
  12. Addie, J.-P. D., 2015, “Towards a City-Regional Politics of Mobility: In-Between Critical Mobilities and the Political-Economy of Urban Transportation”, in Cidell, J. and Prytherch, D. (eds.) Transport, Mobility, and the Production of Urban Space (New York: Routledge) pp. 187-205
  13. Addie, J.-P. D., Fiedler, R. S., and Keil, R., 2015, “Cities on the Edge: Emerging Suburban Constellations in Canada”, in Filion, P., Moos, M., Vinodrai, T., and Walker, R. (eds.) Canadian Cities in Transition: Perspectives for an Urban Age (5th edition) (New York: Oxford University Press) pp. 415-432
  14. Addie, J.-P. D., 2014, Flying High (in the Competitive Sky): Conceptualizing the Role of Airports in Global City-Regions through “Aero-Regionalism”, Geoforum, 55(1), 87-99 (Reprinted in abridged form as Addie, J.-P. D., 2018, “Flying High (in the Competitive Sky): Conceptualizing the Role of Airports in Global City-Regions through ‘Aero-Regionalism’”, in Rex, X., and Keil, R. (eds.) The Globalizing Cities Reader (New York: Routledge) pp.176-182)
  15. Addie, J.-P. D., 2013, “Metropolitics in Motion: The Dynamics of Transportation and State Re-Territorialization in the Chicago and Toronto City-Regions”, Urban Geography, 34(2), 188-217
  16. Keil, R., Olds, K., and Addie, J.-P. D., 2012, “Mobilizing New Urban Structures to Increase the Performance and Effect of R&D in Universities and Beyond” (Ottawa: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada)
  17. Addie, J.-P. D., 2009, “Constructing Neoliberal Urban Democracy in the American Inner-City”, Local Economy, 24(6-7), 536-554
  18. Addie, J.-P. D., 2008, “The Rhetoric and Reality of Urban Policy in the Neoliberal City: Implications for Social Struggle in Over-the-Rhine, Cincinnati”, Environment and Planning A, 40(11), 2674-2692
  19. Fiedler, R. S. and Addie, J.-P. D., 2008, “Canadian Cities on the Edge: Reassessing the Canadian Suburb”, York University City Institute Occasional Paper Series, 1 (1), 1-30
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